FOR DEVELOPERS AND ARCHITECTS

C & C++

  • Small Lie in Big O
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    Writing fast C++ applications is a really complex subject. It often turns out that deep but isolated knowledge of ISO C++ standard and algorithmic complexity of operations does not guarantee the success. Often the bottleneck of our applications happens to be the performance of computer’s memory or its wrong usage by our code. The lack of knowledge in that subject can ruin all our ambitions to create high performance implementation.

  • STD::SHARED_PTR - (NOT SO) SMART HAMMER FOR EVERY POINTY NAIL
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    C++ rule of thumb is “you do not pay for what you do not use”. However, it turns out that this is not the case for some of the utilities from the C++ Standard Library. The key example here is the favorite tool of many developers – std::shared_ptr. The talk will describe the problems related to it in detail. It will also try to answer the question how it was possible to avoid them.

  • Pointless pointers – how to make our interfaces efficient?
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    C++ is not C. C++ developers too often forget about that. The effects are often disastrous. nullptr dereferences, buffer overflows, resource leaks are the problems often seen in C++ applications bug trackers. Does it have to be like that? The talk presents a few simple rules tested in production that will make most of those issues go away and never appear again in the C++ software.

  • Striving for ultimate low latency
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    That talk will present the C++ world seen from Low Latency domain. The world where no dynamic allocations are welcomed, C++ exceptions are nearly not used, where STL containers are often not enough, and where developers often need to go deep down to assembly level to verify if the code really does its best.

  • Striving for ultimate Low Latency
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    That talk will present the C++ world seen from Low Latency domain. The world where no dynamic allocations are welcomed, C++ exceptions are nearly not used, where STL containers are often not enough, and where developers often need to go deep down to assembly level to verify if the code really does its best.

  • Beyond C++17
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    Presentation of features already voted into C++20 Standard Draft in Toronto, Albuquerque, and Jacksonville ISO C++ Committee Meetings as well as the overview of other really promising proposals that have high chances to arrive in C++20.

  • Effective replacement of dynamic polymorphism with std::variant
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

  • C++ Concepts and Ranges
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    The most of the Concepts TS and Ranges TS is merged into the C++20 standard draft document. The talk will present a current design of those features and will provide suggestions on how to use them in our source code.

  • Implementing Physical Units Library for C++
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    I will present all the challenges, design tradeoffs, and potential solutions to those problems. During the lecture, we will also see how new C++20 features help to make the library interface easier to use, maintain, and extend.

  • Beyond C++17 (Part 2 of N)
    CATEGORIES: C & C++

    I will talk about contracts, generic functions, constraints, concepts, ranges, constexpr'ing all the things, immediate functions, "fixing" UTF-8 and aggregates, and many other hot topics.

  • Git, CMake, Conan: How to Ship and Reuse our C++ Projects
    CATEGORIES: Craftsmanship for C and C++ Developers

    The purpose of that presentation is to solve the problems of build system and packaging that we have with large, multi-platform, C++ projects with many open source dependencies. Git and CMake are already established standards in our community. However, it is not clear how to use them in an efficient way. As a result, many C++ projects have problems with either importing other dependencies or making themselves easy to import by others. The talk will describe how Conan package manager - a new contender on the market may address those use cases.

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